Indian high jumper Tejaswin Shankar says patience key to Tokyo qualification

Tejaswin Shankar, holder of India’s national record in high jump, is still far from Tokyo qualifying mark but feels postponement of the Olympics is a boon.

Indian high jumper Tejaswin Shankar isn’t too concerned about beating his personal best.

Instead, he is focused on improving the height of his average jumps and believes everything else will follow, including the Tokyo Olympics.

“There’s always this idea of improving your best. But at the same time, even in training and workout, we try to improve our average,” he told the Indian Express.

“My coach showed me some statistics. He has coached some really good high jumpers, namely Eric Leonard, Jesse Williams. Observing their stats, I figured out ‘well these guys on an average jumped 2.31-2.32 but on a good day, they were able to jump 2.37-2.36’,” Shankar added.

The 21-year-old Tejaswin Shankar, who is India’s national record holder in high jump (2.29 m), enrolled in Kansas State University on sports scholarship and has been training in the United States for the past three years.

The youngster noted that he is a firm believer in his coach’s philosophy and is confident that as long as he’s able to improve his average, the chances of him reaching new heights will drastically increase.

With the men’s high jump qualification cut off for the Tokyo Olympics set to 2.33 m, Tejaswin Shankar will need to beat his personal best (2.29 m) to qualify for the Games.
With the men’s high jump qualification cut off for the Tokyo Olympics set to 2.33 m, Tejaswin Shankar will need to beat his personal best (2.29 m) to qualify for the Games.With the men’s high jump qualification cut off for the Tokyo Olympics set to 2.33 m, Tejaswin Shankar will need to beat his personal best (2.29 m) to qualify for the Games.

Invested in the process

Tejaswin Shankar, however, admits that it’s easier said than done.

“To get to that point, it takes a lot of time. The cumulative effect of training is really important. You have to do your stuff every day and look forward to the next day and do the same thing again.

“So that’s what all these great sports people talk about, the process,” he stated.

Shankar went on to add that he’s thoroughly invested in the process and has the patience to see it through.

“The important part is to just understand and fall in love with the process rather than be in a hurry to get to a result or get to a place.”

Hopes for Tokyo 2020

With the men’s high jump qualification cut off for the Tokyo Olympics set to 2.33 m, Tejaswin Shankar will need to beat his personal best (2.29 m) to qualify for the Games.

It may be a tall task, but the youngster believes that the added time warranted due to the postponement of the Olympics to next year may play in his favour.

“The postponement didn’t affect me because I had not qualified for the Games and by next year, I will be a year older and probably more mature. I will have more time to train,” Shankar was quoted by the IANS news agency.

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